Journey to Epiphany

By Jane Geiger, MHSH

At this time of the Church Year we celebrate the Feast of the Epiphany.  It is said that at a moment of insight and discovery, one has an “Epiphany moment.”  The Epiphany story of the Gospel of Matthew is a classic hero’s journey to enlightenment.  It is told in terms of a physical, geographical journey, but the deeper meaning intended points to an inner, spiritual path.  It begins with a sign that calls beyond the present reality to suggest that life offers more.

The Magi saw a star and left all behind to follow it.  The journey was not without perils: distance, uncertainty, danger.  An encounter with Herod, evil and treacherous, and in the end, the warning to return home by another route.

But their discovery when they arrived where the star had led was their reward and justification.  The manifestation of God was clear.  They saw.  They believed.  No questions asked.  The precious gifts they offered said it all: love, awe, perfect joy.  The perils of the journey were forgotten.  And they knew they received the greater gift: the Presence, the embrace of God, real, soul-stirring, redeeming, enduring.  The journey ended; life began!

Do you have a “star” beckoning…inviting you to step out, take risks to discover a deeper sense of God within: real, soul-stirring, redeeming, enduring?  Talk to the Magi.  Have an Epiphany moment.

Epiphany copyright 2003 Janet McKenzie www.janetmckenzie.com

Collection of Barbara Marian, Harvard, IL

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3 Responses to Journey to Epiphany

  1. Sr. Dianne Livingstone says:

    Thank you, this encourages me to look ahead with hope and to name the “stars” that lead me on.

  2. Erma Durkin says:

    The Magi discovered the star because they longed to understand why the heavenly bodies were both ever changing, yet ever predictably there, and what messages they might have for the people on earth. The unusual star piqued their curiosity, and they felt compelled to act, to go, to search to understand it. It is the vocation, the call, to every thinking human being–to make the effort necessary to understand the unknown. The only way we move from ignorance to understanding is to be curious, to want to learn, to want to grow in understanding. We are never too old to learn, and enjoy the bliss it brings.

  3. Dolores SSJ says:

    Thanks, Sister Jane. Beautiful insights!

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